Ode to oysters

Monday I went for an overnight trip to Indian Beach on Emerald Isle, and today I’m heading to Wilmington. It’s hard not to feel spoiled living just two to three hours from the beach when growing up, it was more like four or five.

According to NASA, more than a third of the human population lives within 60 miles of the coast. While there is no conclusive data on the correlation between oysters and oceanside residence, I think the shellfish speak for themselves.

These bivalves hailed from Bordeaux

These bivalves hailed from Bordeaux

While visiting Paris for the first time last October, I also got to taste these raw beauties for the first time. Until then, the only indirect experience I’d had with them involved an uncle nearly missing Thanksgiving dinner following a nasty bout of food poisoning.

When my friend and I sat down to La Cabane a Huitres — a hole-in-the-wall, family-owned establishment that was probably the best dining experience of the entire trip — I was timid about the bivalves.

“What do they taste like?” I asked.

“The ocean,” she said.

And it was that simple. Letting a half-shell slide down your throat is not unlike submerging the deep blue. Briny, salty, sweet and totally satisfying.

Happy Friday, all!

At La Cabane a Huitres in October

At La Cabane a Huitres in October

Oysters of North Carolina

Oysters of North Carolina

A sunny day by the sea

A sunny day by the sea

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